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PEACH AND TEACH

Peach

The PEACH is a diary kept by parents about how children are using their listening in everyday life. There are questions asking how children are listening when it’s quiet or noisy, listening to sounds around them and on the phone and many more. First, parents write down examples of their children’s behaviour in the diary, then they discuss their examples with a researcher. The PEACH is scored on the number of examples and so the more examples the better!

Electronic copy
Print copy
Score form
PEACH Q7 video


Copies of the PEACH are available for download in the following languages:
Malay
Arabic
Chinese
Turkish
Swedish
Hebrew
Vietnamese
Norwegian
Italian
Dutch
Spanish
Thai


PEACH


A PEACH rating scale has been developed from the original PEACH diary and can be used instead of the diary.
Click here to download.

Peach+ (NEW)

The PEACH+, like the PEACH, is used to evaluate the effectiveness of your child’s use of hearing in real-world environments. Additionally, it provides an estimate on your child’s ease of listening in different situations.

Peach+ (English)

Peach+ fillable version (English)
No … not the fruit!


The Parents' Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children
The PEACH is a diary kept by parents about how children are using their listening in everyday life. There are questions asking how children are listening when it’s quiet or noisy, listening to sounds around them and on the phone and many more. First, parents write down examples of their children’s behaviour in the diary, then they discuss their examples with a researcher. The PEACH is scored on the number of examples and so the more examples the better!
We know that completing a PEACH diary takes attention, time and it is extra work but it gives you and us lots of very useful information about your child’s hearing. You get to know how your child’s listening skills develop over time. Your child’s audiologist can also get information about how your child’s hearing aid settings or cochlear implant MAP is working in different listening situations. This information is useful for guiding audiological management of your child.
Thanks for helping us by completing PEACH diaries.


A sample PEACH item:
4. You are in a quiet place with your child. When you ask him a simple question or to do a simple task does he respond the first time you ask?
I was sitting next to Will and said “Daddy's home” and he looked towards the front door
Will's brother called “Come here William” and Will crawled to him
Will was trying to climb up the lounge. I said “STOP!” and he stopped
I said “Where's your nose” and Will pointed to his nose.
I called “Dinner’s ready”. Will was playing with his cars and he did not turn around.
Will was hiding behind the chair. My dad said “Where's Will?” and Will giggled.

Click here to watch an example video of PEACH Q7 being administered.

Teach

The TEACH is a diary kept by teachers about how children are using their listening in everyday life. There are questions asking how children are listening when it’s quiet or noisy, listening to sounds around them and on the phone and many more. First, teachers write down examples of a child’s behaviour in the diary, and then they discuss their examples with a researcher. The TEACH is scored on the number of examples and so the more examples the better!

Score form
New TEACH Rating Scale
Electronic copy
Print copy
Score form

Copies of the TEACH are available for download in the following languages:
Malay
Chinese
Dutch
Thai

 

Teach+ (NEW)

Like the PEACH+, the Teach+, provides an estimate on a child’s ease of listening in different situations. Your ratings will be used to build a picture of the child’s functional performance and listening effort in everyday life situations.

Teach+ (English)

Teach+ fillable version (English)


Teachers’ Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children
The TEACH is a diary kept by teachers about how children are using their listening in everyday life. There are questions asking how children are listening when it’s quiet or noisy, listening to sounds around them and on the phone and many more. First, teachers write down examples of a child’s behaviour in the diary, and then they discuss their examples with a researcher. The TEACH is scored on the number of examples and so the more examples the better!
We know that completing a TEACH diary takes attention, time and it is extra work but it gives you and us lots of very useful information about a child’s hearing.  You get to keep a record of how a child’s listening skills develop over time. This information is also useful for guiding audiological management of your child.
A lot of teachers have reported that they have difficult observing children in noisy environment because their sessions with the child are quiet times. Here are some suggestions on how to look at listening in noisy situations during your lesson.
During playgroup
In the waiting room area before or after the therapy session
While the child is playing with noisy toys such as skittles, rain sticks, musical toys, musical instruments, noisemakers, noisy puppets
While there are people talking in the session such as the therapist and the parent conversing
If there are any loud outside noises such as trucks going past, airplanes
If there is background music playing
If the phone or the doorbell ringing
Thanks for helping us by completing TEACH diaries.

A sample TEACH item:
5. You are in a noisy place with the child. Does she respond to a familiar voice the first time you call when she is unable to see your face?
Isabelle was playing when a plane flew overhead. She looked up and I asked “Isabelle, what was that?”. She said “Plane!”
Isabelle was playing with a toy drum. I said “Isabelle, it’s too loud” and she didn’t respond.
Isabelle’s mother’s mobile phone rang during our session. Her mum said “Isabelle … what’s that?” Isabelle pointed at her mother’s handbag.
During the session Isabelle’s mother left the room. When she came back she knocked continuously on the door and called Isabelle’s name. Isabelle went and opened the door
We had a CD playing background music at the end of the session. I said “Isabelle … it’s time to go” and Isabelle turned to look at me.
During free-play time playgroup (which was moderately noisy) the teacher called Isabelle’s name but she did not respond.
At morning tea time at playgroup Isabelle was sitting at a table with 5 other children. The teacher called Isabelle’s name and Isabelle turned to look at her.
During pack-away time at playgroup the teacher said “Isabelle … get the bucket” and Isabelle went and collected the bucket.